MUSIC INTERVALS SUMMARY

Naming Intervals Is A Breeze
For Those At Ease With The 15 Keys
For Those Who Are Not, Go Practice These
To Gain That Intervals Expertise.

OK, Let's summarize this whole intervals subject.

Interval Groups:

1. What Are Simple And Compound Intervals?

Simple & Compound Intervals
  1. Simple Intervals = Any interval up to and including 1 octave
  2. Compound Intervals = Any interval greater than 1 octave, rarely more than a 15th

2. Unisons, 4ths, 5ths and Octaves.

These 4 interval types ALWAYS include 1 of these modifiers:

  • PERFECT = Perfect unison, Perfect 5th etc.
  • DIMINSHED = Perfect Interval has been lowered by 1 step (semi-tone)
  • AUGMENTED = Perfect Interval has been raised by 1 step (semi-tone)

3. 2nds, 3rds, 6ths and 7ths.

These 4 interval types ALWAYS include 1 of these modifiers:

  • MAJOR = Major 2nd, Major 7th etc.
  • MINOR = Major Interval has been lowered by 1 step (semi-tone)
  • AUGMENTED = Major Interval has been raised by 1 step (semi-tone)
  • DIMINISHED = Major Interval has been lowered by 2 steps (2 semi-tones or 1 whole tone)

4. Diatonic Intervals.

Any interval within any of the 15 keys.

  • Keys must show the appropriate key signature.
  • Diatonic Intervals don't have any sharps, flats or natural signs.
  • There are 8 basic ones, all measured from the tonic to any of the other 7 notes.
  • The other 48 are between any diatonic note to any other within one key.

5. Chromatic Intervals.

Any interval that does not belong into the diatonic group.

  • They include the "non-key signature" notes D#, E#, Fb, G#, A# and B# plus double flats and sharps.
  • Extreme (but rare) types can be double, triple or even quadruple diminished or augmented (see table below Fb to B##).

Learn the formula to name ANY interval HERE

Inverting Intervals:

Raising the bottom note or lowering the top note of an interval by 1 octave.
More detail HERE.

NAME ANY INTERVALS (MUSIC) WITH EASE

Use The Following Table
To Easily Name Any Interval
No Matter How Complicated It May Be

HOW TO USE THE "INTERVALS NAME FINDER"

1. Searching For An Interval Within A Key (first note must be the tonic)

  1. Find your key in the orange top row
  2. Move down the column to the starting note (Pu = tonic)
  3. Look for the second note in the green column on the left

2. Searching For Any Interval

  1. Find your first note in the orange top row (for double sharps or flats see No 3 & 4 below)
  2. Move down the column to the starting note (Pu)
  3. Look for the second note in the green column on the left

3. How To Deal With Double Sharps

  1. Lower the double sharp by a half step/tone (or even 2 half steps/tones if necessary)
  2. Lower the second note by exactly the same distance. You cannot change the letter name of the note - ex: an Ab becomes an Abb (not a G), otherwise the modifier of the interval will be wrong. (See light and dark green note names in left column)
  3. Now proceed as in No 2 above

4. How To Deal With Double Flats

  1. Raise the double flat by a half step/tone (or even 2 half steps/tones if necessary)
  2. Raise the second note by exactly the same distance. You cannot change the letter name of the note - ex: an A# becomes an A## (not a B), otherwise the modifier of the interval will be wrong. (See light and dark green note names in left column)
  3. Now proceed as in No 2 above

5. Compound Intervals

  1. Reduce the interval span by an octave
  2. Work out the interval name as in No 2 above
  3. Add the number seven to the result (ex: Minor 2nd becomes a Minor 9th)

Intervals Name Finder Abbreviations

Inervals Name Finder

Feel free to download my "Interval Name Finder" (+ instructions) as a pdf (131KB) HERE

You will need Adobe Reader to open it.

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